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Serbia’s Yugoimport-SDPR showcases new artillery solutions at Partner 2017
November 19, 2017
Yugoimport-SDPR Aleksandar 155mm/52-calibre wheeled self-propelled howitzer. Photo credit: Army Recognition

Serbia’s Yugoimport-SDPR showcases new artillery solutions at Partner 2017

Serbia’s state-owned defence manufacturer and supplier Yugoimport-SDPR is showcasing its new artillery solutions at Partner 2017, which is taking place in Belgrade until Friday, June 30.

Yugoimport-SDPR has built a strong artillery portfolio, with the 155mm/52-calibre NORA B-52 wheeled self-propelled howitzer in the lead for securing the company sales and continuing interest from overseas.

At Partner 2017, Yugoimport-SDPR unveiled its new Aleksandar 155mm/52-calibre wheeled self-propelled howitzer (SPH). Based on the NORA B-52, the Aleksandar benefits from a fully automated shell loading system, making it directly analogous to the BAE Systems ARCHER and Nexter CAESAR.

In addition, the Aleksandar will be available with Yugoimport-SDPR’s velocity enhanced artillery projectile (VLAP) shell, which will enable the Aleksandar to fire at up to 52 km.

Alongside the Aleksandar SPH, Yugoimport-SDPR also revealed its new Sumadija multiple launch rocket system (MLRS). The Sumadija is armed with four tubes capable of deploying Jerina 1 and Jerina 2 rockets.

The Jerina 1 is a 400mm INS/GPS-guided missile with a range of 285 km with a 200-kg warhead. The Jerina 2 is a 267mm calibre unguided rocket with a range of 75 km and 110 kg warhead.

Yugoimport-SDPR also showcased the ALAS-C coastal defence ground-launched cruise missile (GLCM). The ALAS-C was developed in collaboration with the United Arab Emirates.

The ALAS is a short-range GLCM with a range of 25 km, but plans are in place to extend the range to 60 km. Another unique aspect to the ALAS is that it is a wire-guided missile, which bucks the long-running trend of cruise missiles using mid-course INS/GPS guidance systems with terminal seekers.

Notes & Comments:

The Aleksandar SPH could be an option for the Pakistan Army, which had examined the NORA B-52 and Denel Land Systems T5-52 in 2016, ostensibly for a significant SPH requirement.

Pakistan’s Ministry of Defence Production (MoDP) met with Yugoimport-SDPR in February at IDEX in the United Arab Emirates. Serbian news outlets, such as Politika, reported that Pakistan told Yugoimport-SDPR that it would seek 500 SPH, of which 400 would need to be built in Pakistan. The Pakistan Army’s Director General of Artillery also visited Serbia in January.

It is not known if Pakistan has decided upon a candidate or, for that matter, pursue the program at all. That said, in 2016 IHS Jane’s projected that Pakistan could spend $844 million U.S. on SPHs by 2024, which indicates that this is (or at least was) a priority requirement.

For an acquisition to occur, the winning system would need to exhibit a balance of capability, reliability, affordability and localization. This would likely inhibit French or British options and, in turn, strongly favour solutions from Pakistan’s established suppliers, such as China’s NORINCO, and smaller vendors such as MKEK and Aselsan in Turkey, South Africa’s Denel Land Systems and Serbia’s Yugoimport-SDPR.

Besides SPHs, Pakistan is also working to enhance its MLRS systems, which will involve the development and production of guided MLRS. At IDEX the Pakistan MoDP expressed interest in Yugoimport-SDPR’s G-2000-52 modification, which extends the range of 122mm rockets to 52 km.

  • Shakeel

    Does the Aleksander SPH, mean that Nora-B52 is surpassed by the newer model in terms of Pak potential requirements? What happened to the Milgem deal with turkey?

    • Re: the MILGEM, we’re supposed to see KSEW sign a production deal tomorrow/today, 30 June.

      Re: the SPH, yes, the Aleksandar is the new version of the NORA B-52, Pakistan should test it when available.

  • Kazmi

    Nora-B52 is a very effect and lethal weapon system and is most suitable for hilly terrain. It would be a great move if Pakistan could manage the TOT. As Pakistan has long long hilly border with India and Afghanistan,So, it direly needs such SPH. This however, is not clear, when this project will come to fruition. It would be a grate kind if Bilal could shed some light on it. Regards

    • Steve

      Denel T5-45 Pack a similar punch and South Africa has a lot more to sell like missiles etc with TOT. We have got no good HOBS lined up for Block III. They also have a lot of experience with Cheetah if we want to squeeze some more life out of our old Mirages. It may be better to get into a long term defence relationship with them rather than the Serbs.

      • Cassadian aka Carl Zeiss Optics (i.e. the South African company that helped make the Cobra and Striker I HMD/S) was spun off from Airbus DS and converted into Hensoldt Optronics South Africa (HOSA). HOSA is looking be a strong player in the optronics market, so we might just see a new South African HMD/S.

        • Steve

          That’s exactly my point. Thanks

      • Kazmi

        I do agree, but, there might be some cost consideration, technical issues or it may be bargaining tactics. It is very hard to preclude. However, it depends,which option suits most to Pakistan Army. As regards your view point about South Africa’s competency in electronics and optronics, that is true. And both counties are already cooperating in certain areas.

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